Repository of Research and Investigative Information

Repository of Research and Investigative Information

Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood of opium-addicted mothers

(UNSPECIFIED) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood of opium-addicted mothers. International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience. p. 7. ISSN 0736-5748

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Abstract

Background It is reported that opium consumption during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and neurodevelopmental defects in infants. BDNF and NGF alterations during pregnancy cause neurobehavioral deficits in the offspring. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of opium addiction of pregnant women on BDNF and NGF levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood as well as pregnancy outcome. Materials and methods The present research was a cross-sectional study. Thirty-five addicted pregnant women and 35 healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Blood samples were taken immediately after delivery from the maternal vein and umbilical cord. Then, BDNF and NGF concentrations in serum were measured by ELISA kits. The outcomes of pregnancy were determined by a checklist. Descriptive,ttest, Mann-Whitney, and Chi-squared test were used to analyze the data. SPSS version 21 software was used for the analyses. Ap-value BDNF levels were significantly lower in maternal and umbilical cord blood in the opium-addicted group (917.2 31 +/- 316.5 and 784.6 +/- 242.9 pg/ml, respectively) compared to the control group (1351 +/- 375 and 1063 +/- 341 pg/ml, respectively) (p p < .0002, respectively). Similarly, NGF level was significantly lower in maternal and umbilical cord blood in the opium-addicted group (302.7 +/- 35.50 and 226.6 +/- 45.43 pg/ml, respectively) compared to the control group (345.7 +/- 43.16 and 251.2 +/- 37.72 pg/ml, respectively) (p p = .0165, respectively). Adverse pregnancy outcomes such as NICU admissions, congenital anomalies, neonatal deaths, meconium contaminated amniotic fluid, respiratory problems, neonatal resuscitation, and low Apgar score were significantly higher in the opium-addicted group than in the control group. Conclusion The results of this study revealed that opium consumption during pregnancy reduces BDNF and NGF levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood, which may cause neurodevelopmental disorders in later periods of infants' life.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: brain-derived neurotrophic factor fetal blood nerve growth factor opium pregnancy outcome fetal-brain bdnf levels pregnancy morphine exposure rat prevalence exercise injury memory Developmental Biology Neurosciences & Neurology
Page Range: p. 7
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Journal Index: ISI
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1002/jdn.10055
ISSN: 0736-5748
Depositing User: مهندس مهدی شریفی
URI: http://eprints.zaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/4734

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